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Identity of the invisible god hacker revealed

Identity of the invisible god hacker revealed

Following criminal charges, the identity of the infamous invisible god hacker has been revealed. This hacker is responsible for stealing sensitive data from governments and companies totaling over 300 in number and across 44 countries. About $1.5 million was realized from this cyber attack.

The invisible god hacker, also known as Fxmsp has been revealed to be a 37-year old citizen of Kazakhstan, Andrey Turchin.  Sometime in 2019, Andrey Turchin ran adverts of source and access codes of top digital companies that he had stolen online.

Among the advertised companies were Trend Micro, McAfee, and Symantec – this drew the attention of many and that was how he became popular. The invisible god sold these source and access codes for $300,000 – $1 million. Millions of dollars were lost due to this. In addition to advertising, he also asserted that he’ll make his customers invisible so they can’t be traced.

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According to reports, his true identity of the invisible god hacker had been long discovered but for reasons relating to him being a foreign hacker, it was kept sealed. Contained in his criminal charges are five felony charges which date back to 2018. It was also around that time that his true identity was discovered.

Following a ruling by a judge in the Western District of Washington, his charges were unsealed. This was provoked by Group-IB, a cybersecurity company. Last month, Group-IB released a report which revealed the identity of the invisible god hacker, Andrey Turchin.

Group-IB traced his first appearance on the web to be in 2016. He was tagged as a hacker with so much technical know-how but less business knowledge. By 2017, the invisible god hacker started his advertising with data of hotels and banks.

Dmitry Volkov from Group-IB described Andrey Turchin as “one of the most prolific sellers of access to corporate networks in the history of the Russian-speaking cybercriminal underground”. Currently, the UK’s National Crime Agency and FBI are now involved in the case as well as some security companies in the private sector.

John Raymond
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